Here’s why Shruti Hassan is miscast in ‘Behen Hogi Teri’

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Here's why Shruti Hassan is miscast in 'Behen Hogi Teri'

Here’s why Shruti Hassan is miscast in ‘Behen Hogi Teri’

The new Bollywood movie “Behen Hogi Teri” begins with the premise that the biggest threat to love in India is rakhi, the thread Hindu women tie around the wrists of their brothers.

One of the first scenes in the film has family members forcing their daughter to tie a rakhi on the man she loves, thus putting an end to any thoughts of marriage between the two.

Gattu (Rajkummar Rao) is in love with his neighbour Binny (Shruti Hassan). But he’s too shy – first to confess to her, and later to tell their families. A series of misunderstandings coupled with Gattu’s reluctance to own up to their relationship leads to many a funny situation.

Shruti Haasan is completely miscast as Binny, a spirited Punjabi girl whose multiple suitors, real and imagined, cause much confusion and heartburn. But this isn’t the worst of debutant director Ajay Pannalal’s missteps.

The quality of the acting is uneven, especially when compared to the steady performance from the unwavering Rao. Watch Behen Hogi Teri only if you think a one-man show is good enough to offset the drudgery of a two-hour trudge through a maze of inanities.

The title of the film, for one, is grossly sexist – it not only defines the heroine solely in the context of her relation, familial or otherwise, to the men around her but it also assigns ‘ownership’ of her fate to the latter.

Gattu and Binny’s homes are opposite each other on a narrow street. It’s a convenient set up for the two to meet. Several circumstances throw the romancing duo together, under the auspices of their approving families especially as Gattu is considered the ‘brother’ who will help Binny’s family during a crisis.

Jariwala, Rao and Tangri have some of the best lines in the film, and they deliver them with deadpan precision. The scene where a drunken Rao berates Bollywood heroes and blames them for his messy love life is wonderfully done, as are scenes between him and Tangri.

The romance in this romantic comedy is non-existent, but thankfully the wit and sparkle in the humour make it a fun watch.

The Shruti-Raj chemistry is worth dying for, but the director and story writer Vinit Vyas’s ideas of a romantic-comedy quite don’t match your expectations.

The new Bollywood movie “Behen Hogi Teri” begins with the premise that the biggest threat to love in India is rakhi, the thread Hindu women tie around the wrists of their brothers.

One of the first scenes in the film has family members forcing their daughter to tie a rakhi on the man she loves, thus putting an end to any thoughts of marriage between the two.

Gattu (Rajkummar Rao) is in love with his neighbour Binny (Shruti Hassan). But he’s too shy – first to confess to her, and later to tell their families. A series of misunderstandings coupled with Gattu’s reluctance to own up to their relationship leads to many a funny situation.

Shruti Haasan is completely miscast as Binny, a spirited Punjabi girl whose multiple suitors, real and imagined, cause much confusion and heartburn. But this isn’t the worst of debutant director Ajay Pannalal’s missteps.

The quality of the acting is uneven, especially when compared to the steady performance from the unwavering Rao. Watch Behen Hogi Teri only if you think a one-man show is good enough to offset the drudgery of a two-hour trudge through a maze of inanities.

The title of the film, for one, is grossly sexist – it not only defines the heroine solely in the context of her relation, familial or otherwise, to the men around her but it also assigns ‘ownership’ of her fate to the latter.

Gattu and Binny’s homes are opposite each other on a narrow street. It’s a convenient set up for the two to meet. Several circumstances throw the romancing duo together, under the auspices of their approving families especially as Gattu is considered the ‘brother’ who will help Binny’s family during a crisis.

Jariwala, Rao and Tangri have some of the best lines in the film, and they deliver them with deadpan precision. The scene where a drunken Rao berates Bollywood heroes and blames them for his messy love life is wonderfully done, as are scenes between him and Tangri.

The romance in this romantic comedy is non-existent, but thankfully the wit and sparkle in the humour make it a fun watch.

The Shruti-Raj chemistry is worth dying for, but the director and story writer Vinit Vyas’s ideas of a romantic-comedy quite don’t match your expectations.

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